Films



Cast & Crew  

Banner
Eros Entertainment
Big Screen Entertainer

Status
Under Production

Color
C

Release Date
March 28, 2008

Language
Hindi

Genre
Producer
Kumar Mangat
Sunil Lulla

Director
Ashwani Dheer

Star Cast
Sunil Shetty…… Laxminarayan
Tusshar Kapoor…… Laxminarayan
Paresh Rawal…… Laxminarayan
Upen Patel…… Chandu
Esha Deol…… Jiya
Sameera Reddy…… Laila
Tanisha Mukherjee…… Chandni
Neetu Chandra…… Inspector Mayawati
Sharat Saxena
Manoj Pahwa…… Pinto
Vrajesh Hirjee…… Albert
Murli Sharma
Sanjay Mishra
Atul Mathur

Cassettes and CD’s on
Eros Music

Singers
Kunal Ganjawala
Raghav Sachar
Earl
Sunidhi Chauhan
Mahalakshmi Iyer
Kaptain Laadi
Kshitij
Kailash Kher
Aditya Dhar
Shilpa Rao
Ninad Kamat

Lyricist
Aditya Dhar
Munna Dhiman

Music Director
Raghav Sachar

Cinematography
Nirmal Jani

Choreography
Ganesh Acharya

Screenplay
Ashwani Dheer

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Movie Reviews  

By Taran Adarsh, March 7, 2008 – 09:07 IST

Subhash Ghai is synonymous with larger than life movies. Movies that cater to the popular tastes. With BLACK & WHITE, Ghai changes lanes. Deviating from the large canvas, extravagant sets and soulful-music-with-lavish-settings, he comes up with a film that’s real, that pricks your conscience… a film that’s in sharp contrast to his earlier accomplishments.

It truly requires courage to swim against the tide. With BLACK & WHITE, Ghai enters a lane not many master storytellers would dare to venture into.

BLACK & WHITE signifies the coming of age of a seasoned storyteller. Sure, he has made great entertainers that have tremendous recall value, but BLACK & WHITE is a gutsy step. It’s realistic, it’s thought-provoking, it’s topical, but not dark, depressing or preachy.

Write your own movie review of Black & White

As a storyteller, Ghai has handled the subject with maturity and a few scenes do leave an indelible impression. But BLACK & WHITE could’ve done with a shorter length and a tighter screenplay. Yet, all said and done, Ghai deserves marks and praise for this courageous step. Watch it for a different experience!

Rajan Mathur [Anil Kapoor] is a Professor in Urdu literature. He resides in Chandni Chowk with his activist wife Roma [Shifaali Shah].

Professor Mathur comes across Numair [Anurag Sinha], who introduces himself as a victim of communal riots in Gujarat. But, in actuality, he is a suicide bomber commissioned by a Muslim fundamentalist group to detonate a bomb near Red Fort on 15th August.

During his fifteen-day journey, Numair manages to take shelter in the Professor’s house and wins the trust and fondness of the couple. While helping Numair to get an entry pass for 15th August celebrations at Red Fort, Professor Mathur introduces him to the warm and loving people of Chandni Chowk.

Amidst all the tension, he is caught in an emotional dilemma whether to go ahead with his mission. Despite his deep-rooted fundamentalist beliefs, he sees this as one of the most colorful and loving areas. Nevertheless, he moves on with his mission. But something is disturbing the mind of this young lad…

The story of BLACK & WHITE [Varun Vardhan] is one of its USPs. BLACK & WHITE tries to peep into the psyche of a human bomb, a fanatic who has a change of heart gradually. The transformation of a heartless, cold-blooded murderer to someone whose inner voice tells him to revolt against his ‘masters’, the change is well depicted on screen.

But BLACK & WHITE is not without its share of hiccups. The romantic track, for instance, stands out like a sore thumb. It could’ve been avoided. Also, the reasons that change the fanatic’s thinking aren’t powerful enough. To be specific, the portions from Shifaali’s brutal murder, to her last rites, to Anil and Anurag entering the Red Fort premises, to the cops arresting the terrorists – the sequence of events should’ve been more dramatic and convincing.

But the last few minutes, when Anurag confronts Milind Gunaji and assaults him brutally, is simply outstanding. One of the finest sequences ever filmed in this genre!

Directorially, Ghai rises beyond the script and has canned a number of sequences well. The portions depicting Afghanistan as also the pre-climax [Anil’s emotional breakdown] are exemplary. Sukhwinder Singh’s music has a soothing effect. ‘Jogi Aaya’ and ‘Main Chala’ are melodious compositions. Somak Mukherjee’s camera captures the bylanes of Delhi well. Dialogues are well worded.

BLACK & WHITE belongs to new-find Anurag Sinha. The newcomer carries the cold, murderous look with gusto, living the role with his electrifying presence. Ghai has been instrumental in carving the careers of several names in the past. Now add Anurag to this illustrious list.

Anil Kapoor proves his versatility yet again. In his last outing [WELCOME], he enacted the role of a person who was on the other side of law. In BLACK & WHITE, he’s a law-abiding citizen and Anil is memorable in this film too. This performance should occupy a coveted place in his impressive repertoire.

Shifaali Shah is excellent. Although the length of the character isn’t substantial enough, the actor stays in your memory thanks to a highly competent performance. Aditi doesn’t get much scope. The senior citizen is first-rate. Aroon Bakshi is efficient. Milind Gunaji does a good job.

On the whole, BLACK & WHITE is a fine effort from a master storyteller who dares to change lanes with this film. In that respect, an effort like BLACK & WHITE needs to be lauded. Targeted at the thinking viewer, the makers and distributors have rightly released the film at multiplexes primarily and the multiplex junta should appreciate the effort, at big centres mainly. It will have to have the backing of a strong word of mouth to climb the ladder.

More than anything else, a film like BLACK & WHITE deserves to be tax-exempted, so that it reaches out to a wider audience across the length and breadth of the country.


Cast & Crew  

Banner
Mukta Searchlight Films

Status
Released

Color
C

Release Date
March 7, 2008

Language
Hindi

Genre
Shooting Locations (City & Country)
Mumbai (India)
Delhi (India)
India

Shooting Studios
Filmcity
Kamal Amrohi

Producer
Subhash Ghai

Director
Subhash Ghai

Star Cast
Anil Kapoor…… Professor Rajan Mathur
Anurag Sinha…… Numer Qazi
Shefali Chhaya…… Roma Mathur
Aditi Sharma
Habib Tanvir
Akash Khurana
Sai Tamhankar
Jamini Pathak
Aroon Bakshi
Sukhwinder Singh…… Special Appearance

Cassettes and CD’s on
T-Series

Singers
Sukhwinder Singh
Shraddha Pandit
Sadhana Sargam
Shreya Ghosal
Hans Raj Hans
Udit Narayan
Jagjit Singh

Lyricist
Ibrahim Ashq

Music Director
Sukhwinder Singh

Background Music
Ranjit Barot

Cinematography
Somak Mukherjee

Art
Leela Chanda

Editor
Amitabh Shukla

Screenplay
Sachin Bhowmik
Subhash Ghai
Akash Khurana

Sound
Rakesh Ranjan

Dialogue
Subhash Ghai


Movie Reviews  

By Taran Adarsh, March 21, 2008 – 00:21 IST

Post KHILADI and BAAZIGAR, Abbas-Mustan rightfully earned the tag of being the undisputed Badshaahs of Thrillers. They made a series of films thereafter — of varied genres — but every time they attempted a thriller, the comparisons with KHILADI and BAAZIGAR were inevitable. That’s because Abbas-Mustan couldn’t outdo these two films ever.

The director duo’s latest offering RACE, which packs glitz, glam and style with A-listers [on and off screen], carries the baggage of tremendous expectations. The stars, the stunning locales, the breath-taking visuals, the mesmeric songs, the electrifying chase, the chic styling — everything you see on screen resembles an international flick.

Write your own movie review of Race

But the million dollar question is, does it live up to the humungous expectations? Does it have its heart in the right place? Thankfully, it does!

RACE is Abbas-Mustan’s most accomplished work, after BAAZIGAR. Any thriller works if and only if the story has the edge-of-the-seat moments and which catches you unawares as the reels unfold. RACE has that quality. The story moves in a serpentine manner, there’s a twist every fifteen minutes and it’s impossible to guess what the culmination would be.

In a nutshell, RACE is a first-rate product all the way. It’s not just style, but there’s substance as well. It has the merits to get catapulted to the Bests of 2008, when you reflect on the year. Bravo!

Ranvir [Saif Ali Khan] and Rajiv [Akshaye Khanna] are step-brothers who own a huge stud farm in Durban, South Africa. They breed horses on their huge ranch house and are also the biggest bookies in the horse racing circuit. Ranvir, the elder of the two, is known to be a very shrewd man. He is very aggressive and is always on the move. Rajiv, on the other hand, is very laidback and is also a chronic alcoholic.

Sophia [Katrina Kaif] is Ranvir’s personal secretary. She adores her boss and loves him. Ranvir is totally unaware of her feeling and regards her adoration as her efficiency. Sonia [Bipasha Basu] is an upcoming Indian ramp model in Durban.

Sonia loves Ranvir, but through a twist of fate gets married to Rajiv. When she discovers that Rajiv is a chronic alcoholic, her world is shattered. Ranvir too is disturbed as he has sacrificed his love for his younger brother because Rajiv had promised him that if he gets married to Sonia, he will leave alcohol forever.

After marriage, Rajiv breaks his promise and the story starts getting complicated. In a weak moment, Ranvir and Sonia come very close to each other and an affair starts between the younger brother’s wife and the elder brother. When the younger brother starts suspecting his wife, all hell breaks loose.

A murder is committed, a contract killing is issued, double crossings become the order of the day… A sharp-tongued investigative officer R.D. [Anil Kapoor] starts an investigation with his brainless assistant Mini [Sameera Reddy].

Director duo Abbas-Mustan are in complete command this time around. Everything is so well synchronized that the end result leaves you awe-struck. The 2 + hours of your precious life that you’ve spent on this film are absolutely worth your while. In 36 CHINA TOWN and NAQAAB specifically, one disagreed with the climax. But the penultimate reels of RACE are foolproof.

Abbas-Mustan get it right this time. Right from the choice of subject, to the choice of actors, to the thrilling moments, music and locales, this thrill-a-minute saga works big time. The game of one-upmanship indulged by the two brothers is electrifying and easily the hallmark of the enterprise.

Writer Shiraz Ahmed’s screenplay has several moments that merit a mention. The best part is, the writing is full of energy and surprises, not once does it take the been-there-seen-that route. It would be foolhardy to single out a few sequences since the film gathers speed from its inception itself. One of its USPs is that every character is out to double cross the other, each character has grey shades and the dangerous games they indulge in make it an exhilarating cinematic experience.

Ravi Yadav’s cinematography is topnotch. The stunning locales of Durban, Dubai and India are captured lucidly by the DoP. But, most importantly, the movement of the camera at several places deserves the highest praise. Note the very start of the film [the aerial view, right till the gruesome accident] or the car chase in the climax [never seen before on the Hindi screen], the camerawork is stunning.

Pritam’s music rocks. Generally, in most thrillers, the music takes a backseat, but not here. ‘Allah Duhai Hai’ [foot-tapping], ‘Pehli Nazar Mein’ [with soulful rendition by Atif Aslam], ‘Touch Me’ [very saucy] and ‘Sexy Lady’ [the new track; trendy] are terrific compositions all and their filming and choreography are masterly. The fact that the yuppie crowd has taken to the songs in a big way, says it all. The race at the start and the chase in the climax [Allan Amin] are fantastic. You haven’t witnessed something like this ever before on the Hindi screen, that’s for sure! Hussain Burmawala’s editing is razor-sharp. It’s one of the best edited works!

Dialogues [Anuraag Prapanna, Jitendra Parmar] are excellent. Styling [Anaita Shroff Adajania] is superb. Background score [Salim-Sulaiman] has the international feel. Choreography [Bosco-Caesar and Ganesh Acharya] is top class.

Every actor in RACE puts his/her best foot forward. Saif has been coming up with sparkling portrayals and films like KAL HO NAA HO, EK HASINA THI, HUM TUM, SALAAM | NAMASTE, OMKARA and EKLAVYA – THE ROYAL GUARD portrayed the actor’s acting skills to the fullest. Now add RACE to his illustrious repertoire. He’s marvelous all through and the bearded look suits him very much.

Akshaye is so perfect. To carry off a difficult character like this is a Herculean task and the supremely talented actor handles it with aplomb. He’s like a chameleon; he slips into various roles with remarkable ease. But the fact cannot be denied that Abbas-Mustan bring out the best in Akshaye. Watch his body of work and you’d agree that Akshaye’s performances in the director duo’s films have always stood out.

Anil Kapoor comes at the interval point, but takes charge in the post-interval portions. With such serious characters in the film, Anil’s role comes as a big relief. Sure, the viewers may find some of his dialogues crass, but the masses will take to his performance in a big way.

Bipasha looks stunning and delivers her best work so far. She’s superb. Katrina is a complete surprise. The actress looks gorgeous, but most importantly, her character gives her ample opportunity to shine in the latter half. Sameera excels as the dumb girl. Actually, it’s a tough job and she does it well. Johny Lever is there for one sequence and his role is aimed at the hoi polloi.

On the whole, RACE is a superb entertainer all the way. It’s not just style, it has substance as well. At the box-office, the tremendous hype coupled with the holidays in the opening week as well as the extensive release will ensure huge numbers in the initial week. But, most importantly, the film has legs to enjoy a spirited run at the box-office. Smash Hit!


Cast & Crew  

Banner
Tips Music Films
UTV Motion Pictures

Status
Released

Color
C

Release Date
March 21, 2008

Language
Hindi

Genre
Shooting Studios
Sankraman Studios
Filmcity
Filmistan

Producer
Kumar S Taurani
Ramesh S Taurani

Director
Abbas Burmawalla
Mustan Burmawalla

Star Cast
Saif Ali Khan…… Ranvir Singh
Akshaye Khanna…… Rajiv Singh
Bipasha Basu…… Sonia
Katrina Kaif…… Sophia
Anil Kapoor…… Robert Dcosta
Sameera Reddy…… Mini
Dilip Tahil…… Kabir Ahuja
Johny Lever
Gurpreet Guggi

Cassettes and CD’s on
Tips Music Films

Singers
Sunidhi Chauhan
Neera
Atif
Shaan
K K
Taz
Apache Indian
Monali Thakur

Lyricist
Sameer
Taz

Music Director
Pritam Chakraborty

Background Music
Salim Merchant
Sulaiman Merchant

Cinematography
Ravi Yadav

Choreography
Bosco Martis
Caesar Gonsalves
Ganesh Acharya

Action
Allan Amin

Editor
Hussain Burmawala

Screenplay
Shiraz Ahmed

Sound
Rakesh Ranjan

Dialogue
Anurag Prapann
Jitendra Parmar

Costume
Anaita Shroff Adajania

Media Relations
Parull Gossain

Publicity Designs
Himanshu Nanda
Rahul Nanda
HR Enterprises

Story / Writer
Shiraz Ahmed


A great thing about this language is that it’s spoken universally through the whole of Bombay. However for Uppities or the college crowd its referred to as Binglish (for Bombay_English). It’s, however, the same ! This list is perpetually incomplete since the evolution of this language can never possibly cease.

An FAQ about Bhindi / Binglish: Pronunciations are in brackets following the words.

Chava / Chavi – Actual meaning of a chava is a lion’s cub.However, in Bhindi it would mean a Boyfriend/GirlFriend (normally the one that’s steady). Chava, is also used to describe to a good looking chap or the normal stud in the locality. No, Chavi would still mean the steady one.

Chikna – Stands for any good looking fellow. Chikna actually means smooth. Chikni is the female version of the same word.

Dhapnya / Battery / double battery – Refers to a person wearing prescription glasses. Dhapnya is a marathi word. The Ghati way of saying this would be “bya-tree”.

Chaayla ! – The original meaning is quiet demeaning. The contemporary meaning is so flexible that “Chaayla” can be used anywhere in a casual conversation. Pragmatically speaking this word doesnt have any meaning.

Haila ! – This originated from “Hai Allah !” but I don’t think 99% of the users know about this. Haila would translate to “Oh God!”

Keeda / SulemaniKeeda – An absolute pest.

Jhakaas – Superb. Excellent.

Mandvali / Mandavli – Compromise.

Gangaram – For a barber. Gangaram is a guy’s name. I guess some Gangaram must have played an immortal role in some play or movie for his name to stick on.

Chagan / Dhating / Hajaam – Hajaam in its true sense would mean a barber. It refers to anyone with a moronic intellect. I think the meaning of the word “Chagan” better be left unsaid.

Atrangi – One meaning of this word is similar to Hajaam. Atrangi also mean something extraordinary.

ChappanTikkli / Punter / Tapori / Shana – Roadside loafer. Tapori is among the most commonly used words in Bhindi.

Charsi / Fookda / Soootya – A smoker. Charas is exactly marijuana. Charasi would mean any guy who smokes though.

Raanti / Saand – A boisterous or an exceeding brash guy.

Bevada / Gutter / Taankee / Batli / JohnnyWalker – A Drunk. JohnnyWalker comes from either the actor by the name or the whiskey brand.

Rappak ( stress on “pp” ) – means Slap. ( eg. Kaan kay neechay rappak lagaoonga. )

Tapri – A road side shop.

Chotay – For any kid working in a Tapri. If the shop has more than one kid … all would have to be Chotays.

Ramu – see “chotay”

Mava / (120 – 300) EkSauBees-TeenSau – This is a type of paan that you get here. 120 and 300 are the flavors of tabacco. Mava is everything that paan has without the betel-leaf. Terms also refer to the person who consumes it.

Manikchand – Manikchand is a famous brand of chewing tabacco. This term also stands for a person who consumes it.

Dhoop Chaav – Means Sun and Shade. Refers to the shops owned by the road side barbers who just have a rag for the Chaav and is obviously hole-ridden to let the Dhoop come in.

Chinese Gaadi – No ! this is not a Chinese make of an automobile!! Its the “Tapri” selling chinese food on the side of the road. You find one after every 10 meters. The best part is that all these Chinese Gaadis are red in color, have names like “Red Sun”, “Red Dragon”, “Fong’s”, or anything that sounds vaguely Chinese. The cook is normally a Nepali gurkha working as a night watchman in some nearby apartment complex. The only criteria to get a chef’s job at a Chinese Gaadi is to have slanted eyes.

Mahim – Matunga / Vasai – Virar – This is a term used for squints. M-M and V-V are neighbouring localities in Bombay. The origin of this term is unknown.

Ghungroo Salmaan – This term is very new but catching on fast. Ghungroo refers to a curly haired guy. Salmaan (Khan) comes in the picture since the “Ghunroo Salmaan” fellow is obviously mistaking himself to be a Hindi film hero. It’s used as a put-down.

Cutting – A little_more_than_half cup of Tea is a cutting. The Cutting concept would have been started by people who used to split a cup of tea between 2 people… and finally the tea vendor started selling half cup of tea and called it “cutting”. A little_more_than_half is given to increase the patrons.

AndhaDhuni / Aadva-Patta – These are a cricketing terms. AadvaPatta comes from Pune, means “Cross batted shot”. AndhaDhuni means “Blind shot”. But nowadays these refer to any guy who doesn’t bat well.

Mama / Maushi – Mama and Maushi translate to the maternal uncle and aunt. These words are thoroughly misused to get some work done. Normally used while speaking Marathi. Every other Marathi speaking street vendor would be a Mama or a Maushi.

Dada / Tai – Translate to elder brother or sister. Usage – see Mama / Maushi.

Uncle / Aunty – Usage similar to Mama/Maushi… just that this is used for the more sophisticated public. Normally with the Marathi ignorant.

Ghaati – Ghaatis are the residents of the hilly/rural regions of Maharashtra. In Bhindi, a Ghati would mean any person whose mother tongue is Marathi. It’s quiet demeaning….. and thus heard more frequently.

Gujju / Ganda-Gujratis. The money men of Mumbai. These guys are easily spotted on the road – either in colorful shirts, embroidered trousers, against the mirror of a parked vehicle combing their hair, or something equally funny. These guys are the second largest community in Bombay after the Marathi-speaking people. Ganda acutally means mad. No need to explain why.

Madrasi – Madras is a place in the southern part of India. Madrasi refers to any guy from a place to the south of Maharashtra. Doesn’t matter where he is from. If he is from Bangalore he is a Madrasi. If he is from Goa he is still a Madrasi. Doesn’t matter. And the best part of being a Madrasi is that you are supposed to eat idli sambar for breakfast, lunch, AND dinner. And rasam-chaval is supposed to be the favourite dish.

Gulti – This is a fairly new term. Used for people from Andhra Pradesh. I don’t have a clue about its origin or actual meaning.
According to a site visitor “well … it is telugu … say it Ulta .. anagram … and u get gulti”

Bhaiya / Pandit – Any guy from UP / Bihar / MP / Delhi / Northern states is called a Bhaiya. Pandit is also used interchangeably but is mostly used for the guys at the Lassi/Doodh shops or for Panwallas.

Paapay / Papajee – A Sikh. Dont know what a paapay means. I am sure its not insulting or anything.

Bawa / Pestonjee – The Parsees. The most harmless. Jovial and great company. Definitely the most teased people on the Hindi silver screen. Every movie has to have at least one funny character called “Rustom” or “Pestonjee” who has to have a fat and an overtly boisterious wife. Incidently Parsees also are the most affluent and among the richest in the Indian community. Bombay is also called “ParseeSthan” since this is the place where you find most of them.

Cheena / Chapata / Nepali / Shaab-babu ( ‘sh’ as in ‘huSH’ )- Any slant-eyed guy is called Cheena or Nepali. Doesn’t matter if he is from Kerala and some genetic disorder messed up his eye. He would still be a Nepali. The best part is many of the north eastern states and even West Bengal have people with slant eyes. However, if they happen to land in Bombay, they would be from Nepal. The Chinese/Japs/Koreans all fall in the same category. Shaab-babu comes from the fact that these Nepali gurkhas call every other person they see “Shaab-babu”. I wouldn’t be too surprised to find out that they call their parents that too.

Sai ( Saa-eeen – the second part is increasingly nasal ) – The Sindhis. The Partition-time migrants from Pakistan. If a Hindi movie doesn’t have a Parsee… a Sindhi has to come at some point to lighten the spirits. These guys are known for all the Papads they consume.

Mia-bhai – The members of the Islamic faith.

Bong / Bonglababu / Babumoshai ( pronunciation should have maximum sounds of “O” as possible ) – for any Bangla.

Bambaiyya – Anything that relates to anything that even vaugely relates to Bombay. Bambaiyaa is something that every resident of Bombay would love to be called !

New Additions by Sunil Agrawal:
All toothpaste are called Colgate
All Tofee are called Choclate
All Choclates are called Cadbury


I just love the line….i has very strong power.

(jaage hain deer tak
hamen kuch deer sone do
thodi se raat aur hai
subah to hone do
aadhe adhure khwaab jo
pure na ho sake
ek baar phir se neend mein
woh khwaab bone do) – 4

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